Chinese Medicine and Culture

NEWS AND VIEWS
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 193--195

A Brief Introduction of The Dawn of Modern Medicine


Jin Quan 
 Department of Preservation and Research, Shanghai TCM Museum, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Jin Quan
Department of Preservation and Research, Shanghai TCM Museum, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai
China

Abstract

The Dawn of Modern Medicine refers to an account of the Revival of the Science and Art of Medicine, which took place in Western Europe during the latter half of the 18th century and the first part of the 19th.



How to cite this article:
Quan J. A Brief Introduction of The Dawn of Modern Medicine.Chin Med Cult 2019;2:193-195


How to cite this URL:
Quan J. A Brief Introduction of The Dawn of Modern Medicine. Chin Med Cult [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Aug 10 ];2:193-195
Available from: http://www.cmaconweb.org/text.asp?2019/2/4/193/273900


Full Text



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The Dawn of Modern Medicine[1] was collected in the Shanghai Museum of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The work was written by Albert H. Buck, B.A., M.D. who was formerly clinical professor of diseases of the ear of Columbia University in New York and consulting aural surgeon of New York eye and ear infirmary, etc. The work was published in 1920 by Yale University press and was collected by the first curator of Shanghai Museum of TCM, Academician Jimin (王吉民), in the 30s of the last century, as an interesting evidence of the in-depth study of the medical history and culture about Europe during the half of the 18th century and the firstpart of the 19th century.

The Dawn of Modern Medicine was an account of the revival of the science and art of medicine which took place in Western Europe from the early part of the 18th century to about 1860. It was continuation of the volume entitled “The Growth of Medicine.”[2] The present volume is the third work published by the Yale University Press on the Williams memorial publication fund which was established on June 15, 1916, by a gift donated to Yale University by Dr. George C. F. Williams, of Hartford, a member of the Class of 1878, Yale School of Medicine.

According to the preface, the author classified his chapters with a simple subdivision according to the geographical districts, Northern and Central Germany, Austria, Italy, France, Switzerland, and England.

The book comprises 13 parts. In the first part of the book, the author introduces foundation of the first newspaper in Paris, France, and the establishment of private agencies for aiding the poor.

Théophraste Renaudot [Figure 1], physician and philanthropist, was a founder of the first French newspaper (1586–1653).{Figure 1}

In the second part of the book, the author describes the state of medicine in Northern and Central Germany during the 18th century and physicians who attained distinction in some of the departments of medicine, as represented by REIL, Hahnemann, and Hufeland [Figure 2]. At this period of time, Germany was living under deplorable conditions, and the state of medical affairs in Germany was very low.{Figure 2}

 Hufeland



In the third part of the book, the author introduces the Vienna School of Medicine and Gerhard Van Swieten [Figure 3] who was the founder of the school.{Figure 3}

 Gerhard Freyherr Van Swieten



In the fourth part of the book, the author depicts the state of medicine in Italy and Italy's most illustrious physicians during the 18th Century.

In the fifth part of the book, the author explains the measures adopted for the control of smallpox which was one of the world's greatest scourges and Edward Jenner, who was the discoverer of vaccination as effective means of protection against smallpox [Figure 4].{Figure 4}

In the sixth part of the book, the author introduces the English and French chemists who contribute their share toward the advance of medical knowledge, as represented by Priestley and Lavoisier.

In the seventh part of the book, the author portrays English leaders in medicine and surgery during the 18th and early 19th centuries as represented by Fothergill, Abernethy, James and John Douglass, Percival Pott, and Sir Astley Cooper [Figure 5].{Figure 5}

In the eighth part of the book, the author introduces medicine in France during the 18th and early 19th centuries and the beginning of experiment Physiology and experiment Pathology in France.

In the ninth part of the book, the author outlines the state of medicine at the height of the French revolution and early studies of the disease now universally called typhoid fever.

In the tenth part of the book, the author discloses the harmful effects of Broussais' teaching.

In the 11th part of the book, the author pictures the golden age of surgery in France, as represented by J. L. Petit et al., in special departments of surgery, as represented by Demours, Descemet, Delpech, Fauchard, Jourdain, and Gariot.

In the 12th part of the book, the author introducers Desgenettes [Figure 6] and Larrey [Figure 7], who were France's most celebrated military surgeons.{Figure 6}{Figure 7}

In the 13th part of the book, the author introduces Hospital of “La Maternite” which was the great French Midwifery School and a few important the principal organizations in Paris for teaching medicine and midwifery.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Buck AH. The Dawn of Modern Medicine. New Haven: YALE University Press; 1920.
2Buck AH. Growth of Medicine from the Earliest Times to about 1800. Whitefish: Kessinger Publishing Co.; 2004. p. 4.